Ghana

 History

Flags
The World Factbook

World Flag Database

Embassy
http://www.ghana-embassy.org/   (United States)

http://www.ghanaembassy.nl/       (The Hague)

http://www.ghanaembassy.or.jp/    (Japan)

Maps
Maps of the World

The World Factbook

World Atlas

United Nations Cartographic section

Currency
World Paper Money Image Gallery

Links to schools in Ghana TBC
Sister Schools

Link Schools Programme

Art Projects
African Art Projects

Zoom School –links to African craft projects

PBS Kids: Masks –General

Books on African Art for Kids
Art-Collecting.com: books on African art
Hahner-Herzog, Iris. African Masks: The Barbier-Mueller Collection
Bacquart, Jean-Baptiste. The Tribal Arts of Africa
Visona, Monica Blackmun. A History of Art in Africa
                                Clarke, Duncan. The Art of African Textiles
Kasfir, Sidney Littlefield. Contemprary African Art (World of Art)

Pictures of African Art
Teacher’s Guide to African Art –Sub-Saharan Africa
Mask with Headdress, Deangle, We/Dan, Côte d’Ivoire/Liberia, 20th century, wood, fiber, pigment, and feathers. Museum purchase, de Young Art Trust and Salinger Bequest Fund. (78.40)
Map of Africa.
Plaque, Edo, Kingdom of Benin, Nigeria, ca. 1600, bronze. Museum purchase, William H. Noble Bequest Fund. (1980.31)
Mask with Headdress, Deangle, We/Dan, slide 1. Repeated.
Baule Masking Performance, Goli Glin, in Bende Kouassikro Village, Côte d’Ivoire, Photo: Robert Rubin, 1980, from Africa Explores, 42.
Maiden Spirit Mask, Agbogho mmuo, Igbo, probably town of Nsukka, Nigeria, l9th century, wood, pigment, and textile. Gift of Herbert and Nancy Baker. (1987.9,2)
Drum, Senufo, Côte d’Ivoire/Mali, 20th century, wood and skin with hair. Gift of Peter and Ann Wengraf in memory of Stephen Heymann to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. (1991.17)
Nail and Blade Oath-Taking Image, Nkisi nkondi, Kongo, coastal Zaire, l9th century, wood, textile, bronze, twigs, glass, and horn. Museum purchase, gift of Mrs. Paul L. Wattis Fund, and The Fine Arts Museum Acquisition Fund. (1986.16.1)
Standing Female Figure, Ibeji, Yoruba, Nigeria, 20th century, wood, leather, glass, shell, plastic, cotton and vegetable fiber. Gift of Thomas K. Seligman and Rita Barela to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. (1991.16.2)
Ivory Figurines, Lega, caster Zaire, l9th-20th century. Gift of Herbert and Nancy Baker. (T90. 125.1 -6)
Gameboard, Dan, Liberia/Côte d’lvoire, 20th century, wood, beads and cowry shells. Lent by Diane and Charles Frankel. (L1992.4)
Mask with Headdress, Deangle, We/Dan, slide 1. Repeated.
Helmet Mask with Vertical Ladder Extension, Bobo, Burkina Faso, wood, pigment and seeds, 20th century. Gift of Marc and Ruth Franklin to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (1991.15.3 )
Standing Male Figure, Ibeji, Yoruba, Nigeria, wood. (74.10.2)
Chief’s Ceremonial Caryatid Stool, Kihona, Luba/Hemba, Kasongo-Niembo Chiefdom, Zaire, 20th century, wood. Gift of Janine and Michael Heymann to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. (1991.71.1)
Antelope Headdress, Chiwara, Bamana, Bamako region, Mali, 20th century, wood, brass, iron and fiber. Gift of Professor Eric Loran to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. (1991 .90)
Elephant Mask with Leopard Crest, Bamileke, Grassfields, Cameroon, 20th century, textile and glass, Gift of John Casado to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. (1986.57.6a-b)
Mask with Headdress, Deangle, We/Dan, slide 1. Repeated.
Granary Door, Dogon, Mali, wood. Lent anonymously. (L.71.34)
Dogon Village, Banani, Mali, Photo: Pat Goyen, 1979.
Street in Dakar, Senegal, Photo: Pat Goyen, 1979.
The Omanhene of Kumawu seated beneath a state umbrella, 1981, with gold-handled swords in the foreground, from: M.D., McLeod, The Asante, 96.5.
Yoruba Women with Ibeji, Photos: Marilyn Houlberg, 1970, from Africa Explores, 46

Languages
Ethnologue.com

Akan Dictionary
Ga Words and Phrases

Learn Ga Now – website with audio and print lessons

Language Books
Kropp Dakubu, M. E. (ed.) The Languages of Ghana 1988
A compendium of information on the families of languages in Ghana, their relationships, distribution etc. Useful for the study of particular language, as well as a guide to Ghanaian languages in general. Each chapter ends with references and suggestions for further reading. Index, tables, diags, maps, 181pp, UK. KEGAN PAUL INTERNATIONAL

Ethnic groups
WorldStatesmen.org

Ghana Web

Books
The Lonely Planet West Africa
Let’s Go Ghana
The Rough Guide to West Africa
Literature
African Imprint Library Services –List of Titles from Ghana
Okurut, Mary K The Adventurous Sisters. Fountain Pub. 1992

Imukat, David P. Alira and the Canniblas  Fountain Pub. 1994

Kalema, Andrew N. The Bull with a Calf  Fountain Pub. 1992

Oloro, N. The Golden Bangle. Fountain Pub. 1992

Lamwaka, C. How Chameleon Avegned His Father’s Death. Fountain Pub. 1992

Jjuuko, D.M. How Lion Became King. Fountain Pub. 1992

Matovu, G.M.M. Magulu and the Gorilla. Fountain Pub. 1994

Oloro, N. Mother Eats Her Son. Fountain Pub. 1993

Kamuli, E.Mwambu and the Monster. Fountain Pub. 1992/1996

Tumusiime, J. The Ungrateful Mother. Fountain Pub. 1992

Africa Book Centre On-line Catalogue –List of Titles from Africa
Duiker, K. Sello. The Hidden Star. Umuzi. 2006
McCall Smith, Alexander. Akimbo and the Elephants. Egmont Children’s Books. 2005
                               
                                Ellis, Mary. Elephant Child. Harper Collins Pub. 2003

Macgoye, Marjorie Oludhe. Further Adventure of the Black Hand Gang. East African Educational Pub. 2005

Ashley, Bernard. Little Soldier. Orion. 1999

Glass, Linzi. The Year the Gypsies Came. Penguin Books. 2006
Farmer, Nancy. A Girl Name Disaster. Orchard Books. 1996

Banda Aaku, Ellen Mulenga. Wandi’s Little Voice.  Macmillan Education. 2004

Videos/DVDs
KiddoMusic.com
Stories from Africa: Children’s Stories from Africa Vol. 1 (2,3,&4)
Narrated by Nandi Nyembe with dancers from the Mahlatsi Preschool in colorful African garb.An exciting new video series explores the beauty, enchantment, wisdom and fun of traditional African stories. Charming original songs and delightful African fables featuring characters like Bush Pig, Warthog, Kafumbi (the brave boy) and Impesa the Hyena, entertain as well as teach youngsters Compellingly told by Nandi Nyembe with dancers from the Mahlatsi Preschool in colorful African garb.

Africa: The Serengeti Imax
AFRICA: THE SERENGETI brings to life the incredible story of the greatest migration of land animals anywhere on earth. The first African epic filmed in large format, the film takes viewers on a journey with more than 1.5 million animals as they travel over 500 miles across the plains of the Serengeti, a place where life and death dramas are played daily within the most important animal sanctuary on earth. AFRICA: THE SERENGETI is produced by Graphic Films Corporation for Serengeti Partners, Ltd. in collaboration with the Houston Museum of Natural Science.

Africa’s Elephant Kingdom
Enter the secret realm of the largest land animals on Earth. Follow in the footprints of one special elephant family as they survive on the immense canvas of Africa. Experience elephants as few human beings ever have before – enhanced by the impact of the giant screen. Welcome to AFRICA’S ELEPHANT KINGDOM. Produced by Discovery Channel Pictures. Produced and directed by Michael Caulfield. Director of Photography: Tom Cowan. Scientific Advisor: Iain Douglas-Hamilton Distributed by IMAX Corporation.

A Day in the Life of a Village in Africa
What is it REALLY like to live in Africa? Scenes of daily life in the village of Sayaga, a small farming village in southwest Burkina Faso. Filmed in 2002 by Christopher D. Roy, Professor of African art at the University of Iowa, the DVD includes scenes of food preparation, building a house, children in school, spinning thread, weaving, making pottery, forging iron, mask performances, a traditional funeral, sand divination, balafon music, and much more. To provide a balanced view of life in Africa I have included scenes of city life in Accra, Ghana as part of the introduction.

African Drums: The Talking Drums of Techiman
Many African people speak tonal languages whose tonal patterns can be imitated by drums. This means the drums can “speak” and communicate over long distances. Among the most famous of these people are the Akan-speaking peoples of Ghana, including the Asante, Fanti, and Bono people of the kingdom of Techiman. This DVD video shows the drum ensemble of the Bono people of Techiman in the royal palace at the funeral of the late Omanhene, in February, 2004. The drummers play a series of seven songs, which are repeated by both the senior, elder drummers, and by their young apprentices. Narration by the Akan scholar Kofi Sakyi, who explains what each song means. This is real African drumming in village context in Africa, not the “made-up” stylized and romanticized inventions of Hollywood, so if you want to see how real Africans play the drums, and hear real drum music, this is the video for you. Director: Christopher D. Roy

Cooking
The People of Africa and their Food
The Africa Guide: African Cooking and recipes

Wildlife and Environment
Zoom School –Animal Printouts –General

Penpal programs
Students of the World

Kids’ Space Connection –International meeting place for kids and teachers

Current Affairs
BBC News

All Africa